Road Safety News
 

Free driving lessons up for grabs in Bury

Tuesday 9th April 2013

Young drivers in Bury, Greater Manchester, have been given the opportunity to win free driving lessons at a local fire station as part of a Safer Young Driver Scheme.

The course, which has been developed and organised by Paul Simpson, fire officer at Ramsbottom Fire Station, is open to anyone (aged 16 to 25) who is learning to drive or who has recently passed their test.

Participants of the scheme will take part in presentations, discussions, quizzes, demonstrations, and practical exercises covering a range of road safety themes that are relevant to young drivers. They will learn about the dangers of alcohol and drugs as well as other distractions such as music, mobile phones and friends.

In addition to this, the participants will also have the opportunity to work through useful exercises covering hazard perception, show and tell (under the bonnet), first aid, crash reconstruction and learn about what ‘makes and breaks’ a good driver.

Paul Simpson said: “Too many young people have been killed or injured on our roads. Working with our partner agencies, we hope that this course will influence young people to have a safer attitude towards driving and give them the relevant information to help make correct decisions behind the wheel.”

The Safer Young Driver Scheme is supported by Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service, Bury Council Road Safety Team, Ramsbottom Neighbourhood Policing Team, and North West Ambulance Service as well as local representatives of Red Driving School, the IAM and the RAC.

The course enables those wanting to find out more about learning to drive or to gain more confidence and understanding of what it takes to be a safer driver, to meet with relevant agencies and discuss different issues with their peers.

In order to be entered into the prize draw for the free driving lessons, participants must attend at least three of the four two hour evening sessions.

Ted Booker, RSO for Bury Council, said: “Paul has taken on a huge task organising this scheme and ensuring the support of other services. We are very pleased with how the first two courses have been received and how the young people attending have benefitted from the course.”

For more information contact Ted Booker on 0161 253 5786.

Comments

Comment on this story
Report a reader comment

What's your view - comment on this story:

I confirm that I have read and accept the moderation policy and house rules relating to comments posted on this website.
Your comment:
Your name and location:
Your email:

Is the scheme being evaluated?
Steve Stradling, Timperley, Greater Manchester

Agree (1) | Disagree (0)
+1

I do not believe it is the fault of the kids. We appear to now be in a society where parents perceive threats to their children from every angle. Threats to children are no more now than they were 20, 30, 40, 50 + years ago. Media has simply raised this perceived threat level.

As long as offspring are wrapped up in cotton wool, driven to and from every event in their life and dragged across a road by the hand without any guidance as to how to do it they will not appreciate how to assess danger themselves. When they venture out into the big world at 11 on their way to secondary education they appear not to be able to cope.
Perhaps this extends through to driving licence aquisition.
Keith

Agree (6) | Disagree (0)
+6

I wish it well. However from what I see of today's youth they should all have some lessons in how to cross the road safely, particularly those having left infant school. At High School, their road sense is abysmal. Just my own observations, that is.

Maybe re-learning the Green Cross Code would help, and how to cross at crossings, and how to walk across a road without the use of a mobile phone. These things will help make all of our children safer on our roads and less of a danger to drivers.
bob craven Lancs

Agree (4) | Disagree (0)
+4