Road Safety News
 

Charity supports Birmingham’s 20mph plans

Monday 21st October 2013

DriveSafe, a Birmingham-based road safety charity, has welcomed the launch of a public consultation by Birmingham City Council about plans to set a 20mph speed limit on 90% of the city’s roads.

DriveSafe campaigns to "make driving safer and more pleasant for motorists, motorcyclists, cyclists and pedestrians" through its ‘Courtesy on the Road’ campaign. The charity has published a driver’s handbook, ‘DriveSafe – An Essential Guide for Motorists’, in association with Aston University.

DriveSafe believes reducing speeds to 20mph in residential areas and near schools, hospitals and shopping centres will significantly reduce deaths and serious injuries caused by “preventable and predictable collisions”.

Birmingham City Council has launched its ‘20 is Plenty’ campaign to support proposals for a 20mph limit on residential roads. The public consultation on whether and how the plans should be implemented will run from October 21 until November 29.

Fay Goodman, DriveSafe founder, said: “Birmingham City Council’s proposals to make roads in the city safer and to reduce the number and severity of accidents are to be applauded.

“Far too many people are killed or seriously injured in built-up areas by people driving too fast and it’s well-proven that pedestrians are more likely to survive accidents at lower impact speeds.

“I also welcome clarification by ACPO that the 20mph limit will be routinely enforced so that people can walk and cycle for their health and enjoyment throughout the city without being in fear of the traffic.”

Contact Fay Goodman on 07976 426463 for more information.

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The typical residential streets and estate roads probably have no reportable accidents to speak of, so anecdotal evidence in these cases can be useful. It's not just about accidents either - if residents report quieter, calmer traffic movements post-20, then something positive has been achieved.
Hugh Jones, Cheshire

Agree (11) | Disagree (3)
+8

Hugh

We have a Briefing Sheet on this topic.

http://www.20splentyforus.org.uk/BriefingSheets/20mph_Support_Rises_Briefing.pdf
Rod King 20's Plenty for Us

Agree (3) | Disagree (4)
-1

Hugh
As we are talking safety, public perceptions have no relevance. In any case, all such surveys would have built in bias (I have seen plenty of that). Authorities have a duty to MEASURE collisions and casualties in their areas, and they should analyse and report them honestly and truthfully. That is what matters.
Eric Bridgstock, Independent Road Safety Research, St Albans

Agree (6) | Disagree (9)
-3

As this subject has come up again and will continue to, it's worth asking if any local authorities have sought feedback from residents in areas which have gone from 30s down to 20s on what their experiences/views are, of their new limit. It would be down to perception and honest observations obviously, but it would be interesting to know whether the consensus was 'no real difference', 'better' or 'worse' etc, rather than trying to glean anything from scant official data. Perhaps 20's Plenty would know if any such consultations have taken place.
Hugh Jones, Cheshire

Agree (7) | Disagree (2)
+5

Another misguided do-gooder who believes that "pedestrians are more likely to survive accidents at lower impact speeds" is a reasonable component of a road safety campaign (compounded by them being encouraged to take less care).

Ms Goodman also says "Far too many people are killed or seriously injured in built-up areas by people driving too fast" - really? That's not supported by data, where "too fast" features in up to 10% of collisions and then the root cause is typically drink/drugs or crime. Drivers who are too fast pre-20mph will be too fast post-20mph (and may also be provoked into risky overtakes). There is no evidence that 20mph improves road safety.
Eric Bridgstock, Independent Road Safety Research, St Albans

Agree (8) | Disagree (20)
-12