Road Safety News
 

Driver behaviour expert to speak at young driver conference

Wednesday 5th February 2014

Dr Lisa Dorn will discuss How to Profile Young Drivers and Target Education at a young driver conference being organised by Road Safety GB in partnership with FirstCar.

The event, “Young driver focus”, is being held in Swindon in May 2014. It is free for Road Safety GB Academy members and more than 120 people have already registered to attend. The capacity is around 150 delegates.

The event is a collaborative partnership between Road Safety GB and FirstCar, supported by Arval who are providing the venue, technology and refreshments.

The conference will look at “cutting young driver casualties now and in the future”. As this suggests the event will be forward-focused rather than a retrospective look at young driver collisions and casualties.

Dr Lisa Dorn is a Reader in Driver Behaviour and Research Director for DriverMetrics, a Cranfield University spin-out company which provides research-based driver behavioural assessments and education.

Lisa hosts the International Conference in Driver Behaviour and Training and is Co-Editor of 'Human Factors in Road and Rail Safety'. She has edited 17 books and published more than 40 research papers, and is currently working with several organisations to improve young driver behaviour.

Lisa says: “Decades of research in traffic psychology has shown that there are clear individual differences in driver behaviour - not all drivers are the same.

“Some young people are overconfident in their skills, seek excitement in their driving or may be prone to getting annoyed with other road users.

“Profiling drivers uncovers these individual differences and is an essential first step to identifying driver behavioural tendencies, increasing self-awareness of personal risk and providing targeted driver education.”

Lisa’s presentation will outline how to profile young driver behaviour and examine the use of psychological techniques in driver coaching.

Young driver focus will be held at The Arval Centre in Swindon (just off the M4) on Wednesday 14 May 2014, 10.00am – 3.30pm.

As stated earlier, the event is FOC for Academy members and the delegate fee for other public sector attendees is just £35 plus VAT. The fee for delegates from the private sector is £100 plus VAT.

Click here to find out more about the event, or here to register as a delegate. For further information contact Nick Rawlings or Sally Bartrum on 01379 650112.

Comments

Comment on this story
Report a reader comment

What's your view - comment on this story:

I confirm that I have read and accept the moderation policy and house rules relating to comments posted on this website.
Your comment:
Your name and location:
Your email:

The point here is how do you undo or change male human genes that have been programmed for thousands of years? Young men in particular have always sought excitement either for the thrill or to prove their superiority and of course to attract a mate.

Young men today are no different from their ancestors. Instead of showing their prowess on a horse or a camel, their car is their symbol of manhood and driving is where many derive their excitement - status and self-worth.

The challenge for Dr Lisa Dorn and her colleagues is how do you undo this natural instinct and make young men in particular lower their peacock feathers?
Charles Dunn RoadDriver.co.uk

Agree (1) | Disagree (0)
+1

Keith, I think the bit you leave off the end is the key bit:

“Profiling drivers uncovers these individual differences and is an essential first step to identifying driver behavioural tendencies, increasing self-awareness of personal risk and providing targeted driver education.”

Decades of research has given an insight into WHY people drive the way they do and, crucially, HOW these behaviours can be addressed.
Matt Staton, Cambridgeshire

Agree (3) | Disagree (0)
+3

Some interesting points raised here.

Lisa says: “Decades of research in traffic psychology has shown that there are clear individual differences in driver behaviour - not all drivers are the same.

“Some young people are overconfident in their skills, seek excitement in their driving or may be prone to getting annoyed with other road users.

Has it really taken decades of research to come to this conclusion? The comments are clearly not incorrect but not really demonstrating anything that the average motorist could not tell a high street reporter.
Keith

Agree (12) | Disagree (1)
+11