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MCI unveils moves to “professionalise” instructor training

Thursday 13th March 2014

The Motorcycle Industry Association (MCI) has unveiled new vocational courses for motorcycle training instructors and approved training bodies (ATBs) which will be introduced from April 2014.

The MCI says that customers currently have “no means of distinguishing good from bad when choosing an instructor or ATB”. Steve Kenward, CEO of the MCI, said that driver and motorcycle training has been “left behind” other sectors.

MCI says that introducing qualifications for instructors and ATBs will allow the motorcycle training industry to “professionalise” ahead of any compulsory requirements to do so, and “before the car training industry has managed to do the same”.

The vocational qualifications will be equivalent to Level 3 (approximately A Level standard) and, though voluntary, will demonstrate that the instructor or ATB will “far exceed any minimum standards”, according to the MIA.

The first ATB course will begin in April 2014 and 20 ATBs will be given the chance to take the qualification.

The individual instructor training qualification will start in January 2015, and any instructor wishing to undertake the course will need to be part of an ATB which has gained accreditation.

Steve Kenward, CEO of the MCI, said: “Driver and motorcycle training has been left behind other training sectors in introducing a framework of recognised qualifications. This move should help to change that. 

“Motorcycles should be a natural choice as a means of personal transport, and for fleet operators too, but both need clearer signposts when choosing quality instructors.

“We are particularly proud to be able to launch this ahead of anything similar in the car driver training industry and before any compulsory requirements to do so by government bodies.”

Karen Cole, director of safety and training at the MCI, added: “Many working in the motorcycle training industry agree that the industry has suffered from a lack of recognition and professional status for too long and that needs to change.

“Accreditation fits into a long term strategy to deliver a ‘route to safer motorcycling’ model, which is a shared aim for MCI members and the Motorcycle Industry Association Trainers Association. 

“We are sure that if we can improve rider safety and raise the professionalism and credibility of the industry overall, we can expect much more support from Government, manufacturers and other key stakeholders.”

For more information contact Stevie Muir at the MCI on 07989 378597.

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It is vital that this section of the industry has a standard to be measured against for both the future safety of riders and for consumer choice/confidnece.

I do hope though this won't simply place another burden on ATB's and individuals who are currently feeling the squeeze following changes to licence catagories & machine types approved for training/testing.
Chris Gloucestershire

Agree (4) | Disagree (0)
+4

I applaud the move towards more professionalism, but we must be careful not to get too into training for training's sake. It must always be training for a real-world, relevant purpose. Too much of driver training is focused on test passing, and not the production of safe, effective drivers.
David, Suffolk

Agree (8) | Disagree (0)
+8

A high performing machine deserves a highly performing rider. Well done to Karen & Co for bringing training well and truly up to the speed of the most powerful machines.
Gareth, RSGB

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+8