Road Safety News
 

Drink drive campaign reaches out to friends and family

Monday 18th August 2014

The latest phase of the Morning After drink drive campaign encourages friends and family members to speak up in order to discourage loved ones from driving the morning after drinking alcohol.

Established in 2008, the Morning After campaign reminds drivers of how long it takes for alcohol to pass through the body – typically around one hour per unit, though this varies from person to person and depending on a range of factors.

The campaign website includes a drinks calculator which gives specific examples of type of drinks and quantities – and how long it is likely to be before the drinker is alcohol-free.

An evaluation of ‘Morning After’ carried out in March 2014 concluded that the campaign has “considerable potential for changing public views on drinking alcohol and then driving the following morning”. The evaluation report also said that “the majority of the participants seem to know very little about alcohol metabolism and how long it takes before an individual is safe to drive”.

This latest phase of activity will run in September/October 2014. It comprises three posters featuring pop art style illustrations of a father and daughter, a couple, and mother and daughter. In each case the non-driver nudges the person who is about to drive, and persuades them not to do so.

The road safety teams that have bought into the 2014 Morning After campaign will receive their artwork in the next few days. Other teams can purchase this specific set of artwork from £395 plus VAT. For more information or to place an order contact Sally Bartrum at Stennik, the organisation behind Morning After, on 01379 650112.

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