Road Safety News
 

Road deaths fall to lowest ever level

Thursday 25th September 2014

Road deaths fell to their lowest ever level, and the number of serious injuries also fell by 6% in 2013, according to stats published by the DfT.

The DfT’s annual report of road casualties in 2013 shows that road deaths decreased by 2% compared to 2012, to 1,713 - the lowest figure since national records began in 1926.

The number of people seriously injured decreased by 6% to 21,657, compared to 2012, and the total number of casualties in road accidents reported to the police was also down 6% to 183,670.

Traffic levels remained broadly stable with a small increase of 0.4% between 2012 and 2013.

Pedal cyclist deaths decreased by 8% to 109, compared to 118 in 2012.

The DfT’s best estimate, derived from National Travel Survey data, is that the total number of road casualties in Great Britain annually, including those not reported to the police, is “within the range 630,000-800,000, with a central estimate of 720,000”.

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Idris:
You'll find many years worth of collision and casualty data on the GOV.UK website here:
http://data.gov.uk/dataset/road-accidents-safety-data/
Nick Rawlings, editor, Road Safety News

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0

The DfT publish data in annual chunks, for understandable reasons. But to understand trends we need to see many years' data at a time, most effectively in graph form as available at www.fightbackwithfacts.com/casualty-data/, at present up to 2011. Many more graphs are available on request.
Idris Francis Fight Back With Facts Petersfield

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+1

I see that for the first time the DfT have now created a paper on the possible/probable effects of bad weather on accident/casualty data. It shows some correlation between bad weather and lower accident/incident stats or at least mitigating the seriousness of injuries by lower speeds and fewer vehicles pedestrians on the road.

This is something that I have been putting forward for many years, as I see that correlation in regards to motorcycling perhaps more than others.
bob craven Lancs

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+6