Road Safety News
 

Top DfT stats man to speak at analysts’ conference

Tuesday 6th December 2016

The head of the DfT’s road safety statistics team is the first confirmed speaker for the second national Data Analysts’ Conference which is being held in Birmingham on 2 March 2017.

The conference is being organised by Road Safety GB in partnership with Road Safety Analysis, under the theme ‘joining the dots’ - how data delivers insight and innovation. The programme will cover a range of topics and include workshop sessions in the afternoon.

Dr Daryl Lloyd, a government analyst since 2004, has headed the DfT’s road safety statistics team for the last three years. His experience spans road freight, vehicle statistics, traffic statistics and housing statistics in his current and previous roles at the DfT, DCLG and the Cabinet Office.

Prior to joining the civil service Dr Lloyd was a research fellow and PhD researcher at the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at UCL.

The conference is being held at the IET in Birmingham on 2 March 2017. The venue has capacity for around 150 delegates and as such early booking is advised. The delegate fee is £125 +VAT with a 40% discount available to Road Safety GB, Academy and MASTonline members. Click here to register to attend.

There will also be a small exhibition running alongside the conference, with places allocated on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. There are also various opportunities to become involved as a sponsor of the event.

For more information about attending as an exhibitor or sponsorship contact Louise Pittam at Road Safety Analysis on 01295 731819.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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One of the biggest problems in road safety analysis has been how to completely exclude the effects of RTM at intervention sites. There had been no method to do this until I developed the FTP (Four Time Periods) method. Analysts are now starting to use my FTP method in full or in part and some of this work may be presented at the conference. For instance, I invented the term "SSP" to mean "Site Selection Period" and this may be helping to shed light on what RTM is.

I have offered to give a presentation at this conference because I believe delegates may benefit from knowing how the FTP method was devised and how to apply it with the aim of achieving an accuracy only bettered by running scientific trials.

I am sure all attendees will find the conference to be of great interest and the improvement in the quality of evidence that may come from what is learned could be well be crucial for road safety in the future.
Dave Finney, Slough

Agree (5) | Disagree (2)
+3