Campaign will encourage courteous behaviour

10.00 | 26 June | | 3 comments

IAM RoadSmart is launching a new campaign to celebrate and promote ‘courtesy’ between drivers, riders and other road users.

‘Thumbs Up For Great Driving And Riding!’ will run throughout August and encourages the road using public to show their appreciation for courteous driving behaviour – such as thanking a driver for giving way.

The initiative will be underpinned by a ‘Thunderclap’ campaign – a crowdspeaking platform that broadcasts a specific message onto social media.

The Thunderclap message, which will be published at 7am on 1 August, reads: “Give a ‘Thumbs Up!’ this August to celebrate and encourage courtesy between drivers, riders and other road users.”

To date, the Thunderclap has 73 of the required 100 supporters – including the Road Safety GB Twitter feed – equating to a social reach of 45k users.

IAM RoadSmart says with more vehicles on the roads, worsening congestion and increasing distraction from mobile phones and other technologies – politeness and courtesy between road users has become less common.

Through its network of 202 local groups, the charity is encouraging drivers and riders to demonstrate their appreciation with a simple thumbs up.

Throughout the month, IAM RoadSmart staff and volunteers will be watching our for good deeds committed by drivers and riders – and will be armed with thousands of stickers to hand out in support of the campaign.


 

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    Excellent idea to promote courtesy thank yous between drivers. And there should be more of it. However, thumbs up, whilst a good catchphrase, is not enough. It needs to be clear and definite, preferably with good eye contact. I always recommend using the left hand, because it can be seen from a greater number of angles, and flat of the hand towards the person or driver. If, because of the circumstances, it’s not appropriate to remove the hand from the steering wheel, move the left hand to the top and open the flat of the hand to the front, keeping the thumb hooked around the wheel, would be my advice. The flat of the hand, being a greater area than a thumb, for example, is more likely to see seen by others. By comparison, a finger lifted up is not clear, decisive or sincere enough.

    Nevertheless, it is still surprising how many drivers don’t even seem to see such clear acts of thank yous. So much, I am sorry to say, for their levels of awareness and observation.


    Nigel ALBRIGHT
    Agree (2) | Disagree (0)
    +2

    Fortunately we live in a civilised society. The thumbs up in Roman times meant the end and the death of a beaten gladiator.

    I have always given an acknowledgement when given a courtesy from another road user usually for not turning against me or entering my road whilst approaching on my motorcycle. I believe that as a biker its important to do so as that can make the difference in the attitude of a cage driver to the next two wheeled rider they may meet. Yet I know of another rider who used to be an ADI who doesn’t believe in courtesy or acknowledgements.. Strange world isn’t it.


    R.Craven
    Agree (6) | Disagree (1)
    +5

    Depending on the driver one is giving a thumbs up to (or even receiving one from) then such a gesture may well have a very different meaning: –

    “The thumbs-up gesture is commonly used in many cultures to signify a job well done. However, if it is used in Australia, Greece, or the Middle East — especially if it is thrust up as a typical hitchhiking gesture would be — it means essentially “Up yours!” or “Sit on this!” ”

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/gayle-cotton/cross-cultural-gestures_b_3437653.html


    Rod King, Lymm, Cheshire
    Agree (4) | Disagree (3)
    +1