Motorists warned as adverse weather hits the UK

09.06 | 17 January | | 0 comment


Authorities in Scotland and Northern Ireland have called on motorists to only make essential journeys following snowfall across parts of the UK.

Amber weather warnings for snow and ice were in place across Northern Ireland, Scotland and northern England until 8am this morning (17 Jan) – with more snow, as well as strong winds, forecast over the next 24 hours.

In Scotland, hundreds of drivers spent last night in their cars after becoming stranded due to heavy snow. Mountain rescue teams were sent to help people stuck on the M74 in Dumfries and Galloway after severe weather led to road closures.

Looking ahead, yellow weather warnings for snow, ice and wind will remain in place in Scotland and Northern Ireland until Friday.

In Northern Ireland, the Department for Infrastructure (DfI) says most routes continue to be passable with care, adding that salting of roads will continue throughout the day and overnight.

However, the DfI is urging road users to only make essential journeys, and if they do travel, plan the route and take extra care driving.

Multi agency responders met yesterday (16 Jan) and continue to monitor the weather, with emergency planning arrangements in place in case of any further weather impacts.

In Scotland, motorists are being asked to check the latest information before they set off on a journey.

Humza Yousaf, Scotland’s transport minister, said: “The snow and ice is likely to lead to difficult driving conditions, so I’d urge all travellers to take extra time and plan their journeys in advance. The high winds forecast for later in the week may also see some bridge restrictions.

“Our winter control rooms are constantly monitoring conditions, so drivers should use the Traffic Scotland mobile website – my.trafficscotland.org – or the @trafficscotland twitter page to access the most up to date information and to check if their route is affected.”


© Copyright John Brightley and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.


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